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Jeffrey B. Travis is currently practicing as an accountant in the Chicagoland area specializing in health care professionals, restaurants, real estate and construction, and manufacturing companies. The majority of his clients are physicians. Since the majority of Jeff’s clients are also “start-up” companies, his expertise in accounting software, consulting and taxes makes his services an excellent choice for any entrepreneur.

His career in public accounting started at a mid-size CPA firm. After ten years working for another mid-size suburban CPA firm, Jeffrey B. Travis started his own firm in July 1995. At this time, Jeff’s interpersonal skills of presenting tax and accounting seminars at many hospitals in Chicago in front of resident, fellow and attending physicians blossomed into a practice niche for individual and business clients throughout the United States as many of clients moved out of the area and began their careers in other states.

Because of this, Jeff’s knowledge of taxes of a variety of states is valuable to understand the tax ramifications of moving to a different state, including the US territories.

Jeffrey B. Travis is a graduate of Northern Illinois University with a B A in Accountancy. He was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. He is the son of an immigrant father and his mother was born in Chicago as well. Jeffrey B. Travis lives in Chicago with his wife and four children.

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6 myths about tax refunds

JEFFREY B. TRAVIS

IRS warns of new scam involving erroneous tax refunds. | The Internal Revenue Service warned taxpayers Tuesday to beware of a quickly proliferating scam involving erroneous tax refunds being deposited in their bank accounts, after a data breach on their tax preparers’ computers gives them access to sensitive client information.

IRS didn’t notify 458,658 identity theft victims. | The Internal Revenue Service failed to tell nearly half a million victims of identity theft last year their information was being used by others for employment purposes, according to a new report, which attributed the failure to a computer programming error.